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I need help to develope my assignment please. here are rhe instructions: Minimum word count for each sub-heading ans...


I need help to develope my assignment please. here are rhe instructions: Minimum word count for each sub-heading answer is 50 words (for example #1 has three parts so your complete answer including a, b and c should be at least 150 words) be sure to cover all three questions completely in the answer.
The chapter begins discussing technical, process and semantic interoperability and ends with change management. The sub-headings in the chapter include:
1. Why Standards are Needed-a) why are standards not deployed? b) what types of translations enable interchange? and c) explain the analogy noted “The Tragedy of Commons,” as it relates to vendor’s self-interest.
2. Electronic Health Records-a) discuss how an observation can take the form of more than one statement and the complications that result; b) explain the difference between two of the six communication sets listed; and c) compose a discharge note on one of the examples listed on p. 26
3. The Devil is in the Detail-a) why is healthcare data unique as information processed by a computer? b) what are the difficulties regarding address geographic objects in standards? and c) discuss two of the seven bullets on the top of p. 28 for postal addresses.
4. Complexity Creates Errors-a) discuss two of the four reasons errors multiply on p. 29 b) how does an error impact data exchange? and c) explain the concept of shared meaning.

Chapter 2 Why Interoperability is Hard This chapter takes a broad look at some of the reasons why health interoperability and
2 Why Interoperability Is Hard 22 This is the core of what we mean by healthcare interoperability, ensuring that sender and r
3 of 12 23 ard Why Standards are Needed The number of transactions in healthcare systems can be vast. For example, a single s

Why Interoperability Is Hard 2 24 the pasture as a whole [6]. The selfish farmer gains 100% of the benefit from his extra cow
Electronic Health Records 25 Element: The leaf node of the EHR hierarchy is an element, which is a single data value, such as
26 2 Why Interoperability Is Hard was a specific but unrealized objective of the ill-fated NHS National Programme for IT It i
The Devil is in the Detail 27 high-volume transactions, which are common across all specialties, and pass over the specific n
Why Interoperability Is Hard 28 2 While some of these have postal addresses, many do not, if they do not receive deliveries o
Complexity Creates Errors Complexity Creates Errors Building a single link to exchange data between two computers is relative
30 2 Why Interoperability Is Hard new features after the schedule and budget have been fixed. Most end users are technically
References 31 Change Management It is a sad truth that many large health IT projects fail to achieve their objec- tives. Brit
32 2 Why Interoperability Is Hard 4. Shannon CE. A mathematical theory of communication. Bell Syst Tech J. 1948:27:379-423, 6
Chapter 2 Why Interoperability is Hard This chapter takes a broad look at some of the reasons why health interoperability and healthcare computing in general are hard. The focus is on interoperability, but we also cover aspects of electronic patient records. The benefits of joined-up healthcare, to provide the right information at the right time and place, depend on computer systems being able to exchange information in a way that is safe, secure, and reliable. The term interoperability means different thing to different people. HIMSSS Dictionary of Healthcare Information Technology Terms, Acronyms and Organizations lists 17 definitions from the strictly technical to include social politi- cal and organizational factors [1]. A widely used definition is: Interoperability is ability of two or more systems or components to exchange information and to use the information that has been exchanged. IEEE (2 This includes two separate ideas: first, the exchange of information, which is technical interoperability, and second, the ability of the recipient to use that infor- mation, which is semantic interoperability A third concept, pertaining to the actual use of the information, is process interop- erability. The HL7 EHR Interoperability Work Group has set out a framework, which covers these different points of view [3]: Technical interoperability moves data from system A to system B, neutralizing the effects of distance. Technical interoperability is domain independent. It does not know or care about the meaning of what is exchanged.. Information theory, which shows how it is possible to achieve 100 % reliable communication over a noisy channel, is foundation stone of technical interoperability [4]. Technical interopera- bility is now taken for granted. Semantic interoperability: Dolin and Alschuler [5] define semantic interopera- bility as The ability to import utterances from another computer without prior negotiation and have your decision support, data queries and business rules continue to work reliably against these utterances. T. Benson, Principles of Health Interoperability HL7 and SNOMED, Health Information Technology Standards, DOI 10.1007/978-1-4471-2801-4 2, O Springer-Verlag London 2012 21
2 Why Interoperability Is Hard 22 This is the core of what we mean by healthcare interoperability, ensuring that sender and recipient understand the same data in the same way. Semantic interoper- ability allows computers to share, understand, interpret, and use data without ambi- guity. However, semantic interoperability is almost always specific to domain and context, and usually involves the use of codes and identifiers. Process interoperability is achieved when human beings share a common under- standing across a network, business systems interoperate, and work processes are coordinated. People only obtain benefits when they use information originating elsewhere in their day-to-day work. The importance of reengineering work pro- cesses to take full advantage of electronic systems has long been recognized, but the lessons have not yet been well learnt. The more we understand about the three types of interoperability, the less likely we are to underestimate the work required to make health systems interoperable. These types of interoperability are interdependent, and all three are needed to deliver significant business benefits. Why Standards are Needed The number of interfaces needed to connect N systems increases exponentially using the formula (N- Ny2. Linking two nodes needs only a single interface, which can easily be agreed by people sitting round a table; linking 6 nodes requires 15 interfaces; but linking 100 nodes requires 4,950 interfaces. The center of the star at the right of the figure below (Fig. 2.1) indicates a single specification being used for linking the six domains. This replaces the 15 separate specifications shown on the left hand side. The problem with standards is not that there are so many to choose from, but that we have not deployed those we have and that there has been no one with the power to make deployment happen. Standards that are not deployed are a waste of time and effort Fig. 2.1 The benefits of one standard
3 of 12 23 ard Why Standards are Needed The number of transactions in healthcare systems can be vast. For example, a single system (the EHR system) at one large hospital (the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Mianesota) processes over 660 million HL7 messages a year, or about 2 million messages a day (Anthony J, 2008, personal communication). Examples of functions needing interoperability cover a wide range including hat cr bi- and Requests for investigations such as laboratory tests and radiology Prescriptions for medication and other therapy Orders for nursing care, equipment, meals, and patient transport Investigation reports from laboratories, imaging. and other diagnostic departments Administrative data such as patient registration and identification; admissions, discharges, and transfers (ADT); and appointments Letters and memos from one clinician to another, including referral, clinic, and discharge letters Transfer and merging of electronic medical records Information used for management, audit, and monitoring Commissioning, billing, and accountancy er- are ng ro- he ly le ver Any interchange typically involves two translations: first from the native language of the sender to the wire format; second from the wire format to the native language of the recipient. Problems begin because every computer system stores data internally in a dif- ferent way. This means that to communicate, data has to be translated from one format or internal language into another. The solution involves translating to a standard wire format (a lingua franca) such as a version of HL7 that is understood by each party. The Rosetta Stone from ancient Egypt, now in the British Museum, provides an analogy. The Rosetta Stone contains the same proclamation in three languages, used by the priests (Hieroglyphic), the court (Greek), and the people (Demotic). In our context, the three languages could be those used by a sending system, the receiving system, and a common wire format used for information interchange, such as HL7. The meaning of a message is precisely the same in each language, but the notation is quite different. The inscribers of the Rosetta Stone only needed to perform their translation once only, but in computer interoperability, each and every message has to be translated from one format to another without error. The choice of interchange language is not sufficient to ensure interoperability. Each transaction needs to be defined in unambiguous detail as part of a complete, consistent, coherent, and com- puter-readable set of specifications for that transaction to ensure interoperability between the machines and minimize any possibility of error. You may ask why have health interoperability standards worked in some places and not in others? One explanation is to consider the individual self-interest. It is usually in each vendor's financial self-interest to provide a proprietary nonstandard interface to a customer, even though they know well that this is ultimately creating an interoperability nightmare. There is an analogy with The Tragedy of the Commons, where it is each farmer's interest to add an extra cow to the common grazing land, even though that degrades ly ce, es le te ve e
Why Interoperability Is Hard 2 24 the pasture as a whole [6]. The selfish farmer gains 100% of the benefit from his extra cow, but the downside is shared between everyone. This is because the divi- sion of costs and benefits is unequal. It pays each farmer to add additional cows to the pasture even while it continues to degrade. The solution to this conundrum is to appoint a regulator with teeth, who every one agrees shall specify what standards shall be used within their geographical area, ideally in full consultation with all concerned interests. You have to do what the regulator says, assuming he has appropriate means to enforce what he says. The ONC's meaningful use regulations are one example. Electronic Health Records An electronic health record (EHR) is best thought of as a collection of statements, which are a faithful record of what clinicians have heard, seen, thought, and done (7]1. The EHR is not really a collection of facts, but rather a set of observations about a particular patient, which have been made by clinicians, each at a specific time and place for some purpose. Each clinical statement is an observation, and so it is quite possible for two state- ments about the same event to disagree with each other. Such disagreements can often be resolved if the context or provenance of each statement (who stated it, when, and where) is recorded. As with a work of art, a statement without prove- nance is of doubtful validity The ISO 13606 reference model for electronic health record communication sets out a useful hierarchical structure for clinical information in the context of exchang- ing clinical information between parties (8]: Composition: The EHR is made up of compositions. The composition is a key concept; it is the set of information committed to one EHR by a clinician relating specific clinical encounter. Each composition shares common metadata such as the author, subject (patient), date/time, and location. Progress notes, labora- tory test reports, discharge summaries, clinical assessments, and referral letters are all examples of compositions. Folder: Compositions may be grouped together into folders and subfolders Folders may be used as containers for various purposes, grouping together the records by episode, care team, clinical specialty, condition, or time period. Entry: Each composition comprises a number of entries, also known as clinical statements. An entry is the information recorded in the EHR as a result of a sin- gle clinical action, observation, interpretation, or intention. It may be thought of as a line in the record. Examples include the entries about a symptom, a labora- tory result, a diagnosis, or a prescribed drug. Section: Entries may be grouped together in sections. A section is a grouping of related data within a composition usually under a heading such as Presenting History, Allergies, Examination, Diagnosis, Medication, and Plans. Sections may have subsections. to a
Electronic Health Records 25 Element: The leaf node of the EHR hierarchy is an element, which is a single data value, such as systolic blood pressure, a drug name, or body weight. Cluster: Related elements may sometimes be grouped into clusters. For example, systolic and diastolic blood pressures are separate elements, but may be grouped into a cluster (e.g., 140/90), which represents one item in an entry (Fig. 2.2). Every clinical specialty has its own way of working. The grand vision of joined-up healthcare is predicated on the notion that patient records can be shared electronically between clinicians from different specialties. Historically, this has been largely wishful thinking. There have been few successes and many failures. Yet, this is the promise of President Obama's HITECH Act and Grouping within EHR Folder Sub-folders within folders Subject Author Common contexdmetadata Location Date/time Composition Progress note Referral letter Examples Laboratory report Discharge summary Heading within composition Findings Section EHR structure ISO 13606) Examples Problem list Current medication clinical statement Prescribed drug detals Entry Examples Laboratory result Diagnosis Related elements Full blood count Cluster Examples Diastolic and systolic BP Medication Single data item (eat) Hb count Element Examples Drug name Fig. 2.2 Structural aspects of the EHR
26 2 Why Interoperability Is Hard was a specific but unrealized objective of the ill-fated NHS National Programme for IT It is difficult to share information between different computer applications even within the same specialty. This is because each computer application stores data in a different way and may use different internal codes. Furthermore, even within the same specialty, the information about an outpatient visit can differ greatly from that about an elective surgical operation or an emergency admission. The GP2GP project in England illustrates the point. Patients have a lifelong med- ical record, which follows them when they move from one GP to another. In an ideal world, each patient's records would be sent electronically from their old practice to the new in a manner that avoids the need to reenter information. The GP2GP project set out to do just that, although the project's leaders recognized that it could a poi- soned chalice [9]. The work has been every bit as difficult as predicted, and each record has to be carefully quality-checked before transmission and on receipt; after 10 years work it is a qualified success Now, consider some of the variety by thinking about some examples of a "dis- charge letter" (10]. Each of these is a composition and relates to a discharge event, but the information contents are diverse: An elderly patient discharged home after recovering from a fractured femur after a fall Mother and baby following birth A family after a course of counseling by a clinical psychologist Initial consultation report from an ophthalmologist notifying a proposed opera- tion for cataract Letter to GP notifying that a patient has been diagnosed with cancer and outlin ing the treatment plan Discharge from hospital following coronary artery bypass grafts Postmortem report Similarly, the content of different types of clinical laboratory report are quite dif ferent, as is the work done in each type of laboratory. Histopathology examines cells with a microscope; microbiology grows bacteria to identify them; hematologists count blood cells, and clinical chemistry measures chemical concentrations by mea- suring the intensity of color changes when chemicals are added. The only common- ality is that they all work with specimens extracted from patients. Yet, even the specimen workflow is not fixed; sometimes the requester supplies the sample, sometimes the sample is taken by the laboratory, and sometimes the patient is required to be present in person. The Devil is in the Detail Much of the hard work involved in health interoperability and healthcare computing lies in teasing out the detail of hundreds and thousands of different use cases. Information technology analysts and those who pay them tend to focus on the
The Devil is in the Detail 27 high-volume transactions, which are common across all specialties, and pass over the specific needs of smaller specialties. Yet, the common stuff is not usually the most important clinically. In medicine, as in art, the value of any piece of informa- tion is often related to its rarity. One way to simplify the problem is to distinguish between information that needs to be processed by computer and that which needs to be read and understood by human users. Humans are good at judging the significance of small discrepancies, but digital computers are unforgiving of a single unexpected bit. Computer processing is essential when data has to be identified, matched, retrieved, or counted. For computer processing, the information needs to be struc- tured, complete, unambiguous, and validated. Human readers need information in a format that they can understand. This does not have to be highly structured, although it needs to be easy to read and accompa- nied by supporting contextual data such as who wrote it, when and where, and for what purpose. Even apparently simple concepts such as name and address are surprisingly com- plex on close inspection. In spite of years of effort, there are still no satisfactory international standards for name and address. Even the order in which names and addresses are written varies substantially between countries. For example, one person may have several names and several addresses, which they can change at will. A woman may use her maiden name in one context and her married name in another. One person may use several addresses (home, work, previ- ous, holiday, etc.), and each address is likely to be associated with different sets of people, such as family members, friends, or colleagues Addresses We all know what an address is, or do we? Some of the difficulties were out- lined at an ISO workshop on address standards [11. An address may be defined as a label used to reference a geographical object such as a property through the use of identifiable real-world objects The most common form of address is the postal address, used for the delivery of mail, where the address is essentially a routing instruction leading to the prop- erty. However, addresses are not restricted to properties that receive deliveries of mail. They need to be created for a wide range of geographic objects such as Domestic properties Commercial properties Industrial premises Public buildings (schools, hospitals, prisons, halls, leisure facilities, public toilets, etc.) Other buildings (churches, monuments, etc) Places where events take place (sports fields, parks, etc.)
Why Interoperability Is Hard 28 2 While some of these have postal addresses, many do not, if they do not receive deliveries of mail. However, they need to be identified and accessed for a range of purposes, such as: . To identify delivery points for goods or services To uniquely identify people via their place of residence To identify where people live and work, for planning public services To levy taxes on people and organizations For deployment and contingency planning by emergency services For property registration and transactions To identify customers and potential customers Addresses generally follow a simple structure incorporating the names or numbers of a nested set of spatial units: Subunit within a building or property Building or property within a street Street but some rural areas do not have street names One or more geographic areas (locality, town, county, etc.) Country Part of such an address is often abbreviated by a code (e.g., a postcode or area code). The exact definition of each of these levels in an address varies from country to country. The granularity of property units is an issue. Many buildings large and small can incorporate several addressable objects within a single physical structure. Such multiple-occupancy properties include bed-sits with shared bathrooms and/or kitchen facilities, shared houses, student and worker accommodation, residential care homes for the aged and disabled, flats with third-party access to the inside of the property for delivery purposes, flats where there is a single point of delivery for all residents, business premises with residential owners, managers or staff, shared business properties with no particular differentiation (normally companies that are associated compa- nies), businesses, each with their own private area, but shared reception and toilet facilities, and self-contained businesses with one shared entrance. There are no clear rules to define at what level of granularity these types of premises should be recorded. The life cycle of an address is complex. Addresses often need to be created before the building itself is created. For example, temporary addresses are often allocated during the planning or construction phase of new develop- ments. Changes to addresses can occur due to merging of two or more proper- ties, extension, subdivision or demolition of a property, change of property number or name, occupancy or use and the names of areas used in the address (e.g., due to administrative area reorganization).
Complexity Creates Errors Complexity Creates Errors Building a single link to exchange data between two computers is relatively straight- forward. Everyone sits round a table and works out what they are going to do. This approach works for very small projects, where each person is colocated, but it does not scale. An alternative approach is to provide rigorous implementation guidelines, but these are often complex and voluminous. For example, in the NHS Pathology Message Implementation Project (PMIP), a successful national project to send clin- ical chemistry and hematology laboratory test reports to all GPs in England, the implementation guidelines comprise almost a million words (more than ten times the length of this book). However, the endeavor to be rigorous can create errors caused by the sheer length and complexity of the specifications A related problem arises when the domain experts (such as doctors, nurses, and managers) are unable to fully understand these specifications due to the complexity of language or simply the time it takes to read them. As a consequence, these speci- fieations may not be reviewed at the specification stage as thoroughly as is required Errors multiply according to: 1. The probability of misunderstanding any part of the specification. This depends on difficulty of language and domain and technical knowledge of participants (people with high levels of both technical and domain knowledge are rare). 2. The length of specification. In a long specification, exactly the same idea may be presented in different ways in two places, but each may be understood differ- ently. If large blocks of information are replicated in different sections, with small but important differences, these differences may be missed. 3. The number of options permitted. Optionality greatly increases the chance of error. 4. The number of times different implementations to be made. Each implementa- tion involves mapping or translating the specification into the local implementa- tion language. Misunderstanding inevitably leads to error [12]. Errors increase costs and reduce quality, create delays, and hit profits and reputation. Successful specifications avoid errors by limiting scope, being easy to understand, relatively short and simple, with few if any options. Many problems could be avoided by adequate thought and prep- aration by both users and suppliers. If time is running out, it is all too easy to be vague in a specification or offer the implementer a choice of options depending on the local context Often, both users and suppliers genuinely believe that they are in full agreement until the moment when users try to use the final product. Problems lie on both sides Users do not fully understand what they want, let alone what other parties can or cannot provide; they do not commit enough time or effort up front to fully review written requirements specifications; they then will not commit to these and insist on
30 2 Why Interoperability Is Hard new features after the schedule and budget have been fixed. Most end users are technically unsophisticated, do not understand the development life cycle, and are simply unable to perform the sort of scrutiny that is demanded of them. This is why users need a much higher level of education in health informatics than has been provided in the past. Suppliers are equally guilty. They often try to shoehorn the users' requirements to fit their existing systems or patterns, believing that it will be quicker, cheaper, and lower risk to reuse what already exists while failing to grasp that the user really needs something else and will never be happy without it. Suppliers often lack spe- cialized domain knowledge and fail to understand the user's business processes at the required level of detail. Many suppliers focus attention on the high-volume aspects of health informatics, in part because they lack the domain knowledge to deal with the idiosyncrasies of every specialty. Shared meaning between computers requires shared understanding between all of the human participants. As an analogy, consider the purchase of a new kitchen. The kitchen designer prepares a plan of the new kitchen. This plan is checked, reviewed, and signed off by the customer and is the basis of the contract. This plan uses a precise technical notation, which provides a means of communicating pre- cisely the user's needs to the implementer (manufacturer), in a form that can be understood by both. Manufacture only begins after the customer has agreed the specification. A different but related set of plans are used in the manufacturing pro- cess to specify the exact details of every last screw. The challenge in interoperability is similar but harder; it is to ensure understand- ing both horizontally across business processes and vertically between users and developers (Fig. 2.3). Computers work by matching strings Bit-perfect Need for perfection Specfications must be stringent Computers store data in different ways A to wire format Translation Double translation Wire format to B Standard interchange language Each system speaks its own language Interoperability is hard Managers wish to re-use existing software Developers Lack domain knowledge Developers and users fail to understand each other Every specialty speaks its own dialect Users do not know what they really want Users Won't commit to requirements Keep asking for changes Do not understand software development Fig. 2.3 Why interoperability is hard
References 31 Change Management It is a sad truth that many large health IT projects fail to achieve their objec- tives. British MP Maria Eagle was addressing the Chief Executive of the NHS about a succession of disastrous Health IT projects when she said: If you saw someone walk into a brick wall, pick themselves up and walk into that same brick wall again, and pick themselves up and walk into the brick wall again, would the thought maybe cross your mind that they might be drunk or of unsound mind or would you perhaps conclude that they were incapable of avoiding brick walls? PAC [13] John Kotter [14] in his book Leading Change has identified eight errors in managing innovation and change (Table 2.1). common ErOrs and remedies in management of change Table 2.1 Common errors Proposed remedies 1. Not establish a great enough sense of urgency 2. Fail to create a sufficiently powerful guiding coalition Establish a sense of urgency that something really has to be done (it even helps to have a crisis) Form a powerful guiding coalition of key stakeholders with position power, expertise, credibility, and leadership 3. Underestimate the power of Create a vision and strategy which is desirable, feasible, focused, flexible, and can be commu- nicated in less than 5 min vision 4. Undercommunicate the vision by a factor of 10 (or 100 or even 1,000) Communicate the change vision simply with examples. This needs to be repeatcd over again in multiple forums; address apparent inconsis- tencies, listen and be listened to 5. Permit obstacles to block the Empower employees to modify structures and systems to bring about the changes required. Changes will be needed in process, workflow and information systems Generate short-term wins which are visible, clearly related to the change effort and build new vision 6. Fail to create short-term wins momentum 7. Declare victory too soon Consolidate gains, reduce interdependencies, and produce more change Anchor new approaches in the culture. This comes last, not first 8. Neglect to anchor changes firmly in the corporate culture References 1. HIMSS. HIMSS dictionary of healthcare information technology terms, acronyms and organi- zations. Chicago: HIMSS; 2006 2. IEEE. IEEE standard computer dictionary: a compilation of IEEE standard computer glossa- ries. New York: Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers; 1990. 3. Gibbons P et al. Coming to terms: scoping interoperability in healthcare. Final. HL7 EHR Interoperability Work Group; Feb 2007.
32 2 Why Interoperability Is Hard 4. Shannon CE. A mathematical theory of communication. Bell Syst Tech J. 1948:27:379-423, 623-656 5. Dolin R, Alschuler L. Approaching semantic interoperability in Health Level Seven. J Am Med Inform Assoc. 2011;18:99-103 6. Hardin G. The tragedy of the commons. Science. 1968;162(3859): 1 243-8. 7. Rector A, Nowlan W, Kay S. Foundations for an electronic medical record. Methods Inf Med. 1991:30:179-86 8. Health Informatics - Electronic health record communication Part 1: Reference Model, International standard, ISO 13606-1. Geneva: ISO; 2008. 9. Purves I, Fogarty L, Markwell D. The Holy Grail or poisoned chalice: the GP-GP record trans- fer project. Newcastle: HIRI; 2001 10. Benson T. Why industry is not embracing standards. Int J Med Inform. 1998;48:133-6 11. Walker R. A general approach to addressing. In: ISO Workshop on address standards: consid- ering the issues related to an international address standard. Copenhagen; 2008. p. 23-7. 12. Benson T. Prevention of errors and user alienation in healthcare IT integration programmes. Inform Prim Care. 2007:15(1): 1-7. 13. PAC. Public accounts committee sixty-second report. London: House of Commons; 1998. 14. Kotter JP. Leading change. Boston: Harvard Business School Press; 1996.
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Answer #1

Ans 1 (a)

The main issue with standards is not that there is a multitude of them to choose from, but rather that firms fail to adequately incentivise the use of those (standards) that they already possess. Typically, the problem is that there is no one - such as a regulator or supervisor etc. - with the power to deploy these standards in an ordered (i.e. organised) way. Standards that aren't deployed are a waste of time and effort.

Ans 1 (b)

An interchange usually involves two translations: first, from the sender's native language to the wire format and; second, from the wire format to the native language of the recipient. HL7 basically provides a common lingua franca (i.e. a common language between speakers with different native tongues) to do all this.

Ans 1 (c)

As per the analogy, in a shared-resource system (the common grazing land), individual users (farmers) who act independently - guided by their own self-interest - behave contrary to the common welfare of all users by depleting/ruining the resource through incessant, collective action. Applying this analogy - we see that it is in the vendor's financial interest to provide the customer with a proprietary non-standard interface - even though they're aware that this might lead to massive interoperability problems eventually.

Ans 2 (a)

An observation can take the form of more than one statement because it is not a fact. Observations are essentially what clinicians have heard/seen/thought/done with respect to a particular patient - at a specific time and place - and under certain specific contexts. These are all variable. Two statements - about the same events - may therefore, differ significantly. The complication, created by these differences, is that the validity of the clinical results becomes dubious. Due to this, electronic health records are rendered unfit for the purposes of future research. These records cannot be used to support claims on payments or defend legal actions either!

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